Category Archives: Fashion

André Leon Talley’s Documentary Will Perform at the Toronto International Film Festival

The 2017 Toronto International Film Festival is quickly approaching and we have another must-see film to add to our watch list: André Leon Talley’s documentary.

Called The Gospel According to André, the 94-minute film will make its official premiere at TIFF 2017 on Sept. 8, with Magnolia Pictures planning a spring 2018 North American theatrical release. Directed by Kate Novack, the “funny and poignant portrait” will chronicle the life of the 67-year-old former Vogue editor-at-large, and will include archival footage of André’s illustrious career, starting with his involvement in Andy Warhol’s Factory during the ’70s, according to WWD.

“André has been an unmissable fixture in the front row of fashion for as long as I can remember, but the story of how he got there has never really been told in an intimate way,” Novack explained to WWD.

Of course, plenty of fashion luminaries will be present, including Anna Wintour, Marc Jacobs, Tom Ford, Valentino and Manolo Blahnik. It will also touch on two important women in Talley’s life: his grandmother, Bennie Frances Davis, a maid on Duke’s campus who raised André with a strong sense of discipline and Diana Vreeland, who took him on as an assistant for a 1974 Metropolitan Museum of Art fashion exhibit and helped launch his career.

Talley, himself, describes the flick as his “journey in the chiffon trenches,” and said the firs take of the film was “glorious.”

Talley’s film isn’t the only fashion documentary coming out this September — Manolo Blahnik’s documentary, Manolo: The Boy Who Made Shoes for Lizards, is set to release Sept. 15, while Zac Posen’s documentary, House of Z, will premiere Sept. 6 exclusively on Vogue.com. Dries Van Noten will also have his own documentary called Dries, though no release date has been confirmed yet.

Gabriela Hearst’s Prize-Winning Fall Collection Will Make You Reconsider Wool

Taking home a prize-winning piece of fashion just got easier: Gabriela Hearst won the Fall 2017 International Woolmark Prize for womenswear and the collection has landed exclusively at MyTheresa (shop it here). Encompassing pieces as varied as a trench coat and one-piece long johns, the entire range is linked by a common factor: wool. It’s not your grandmother’s knit, though; Hearst was a virtuoso, using fabrications like luxurious, ultrafine Merino wool and a wool-velvet hybrid.

“The idea was to show the ultra luxury side of wool and create desirability,” Hearst told ELLE.com, explaining that the idea of wool as a scratchy, bulky fabric is outdated. “Merino wool is extremely soft and can even be knitted so that it’s lighter than cashmere. They’re as thin as second-skin and can you warm and cool.”

Unlike some collections crafted for the runway or industry review that consumers never see, every piece of Hearst’s prize-winning line-up was bought by retailers. Along with MyTheresa, shoppers can find it at luxe stores in Dubai, London, Shanghai, Hong Kong, and others.

Hearst’s muse for fall is highly specific: WWII Italian journalist and writer Oriana Fallaci. “She interviewed the main political figures of her time, including Indira Gandhi, Yasser Araft, Ali Buto, Golda Meir, Henry Kissinger, and the Ayatollah Khomeini. She was never scared of asking the tough questions and was impossibly stylish.”

Some Things to Know About Hollywood’s Top Residents

One week after Forbes released their annual list of Hollywood’s highest paid actresses, they told us who the top earning actors were. You’ll never guess which group earned more. Or, you definitely will. Turns out, continuing their winning streak, men out-earned women. By a lot.

Emma Stone’s $26 million paycheque didn’t even come close to Mark Wahlberg’s impressive $68 million. Let that sit in: in 2017, the highest-paid actor in Hollywood made 2.6 times what the highest-paid actress did. When you compare the two lists as a whole, things look even worse. The 10 top-paid actors cashed a combined $488.5 million, almost 3 times their female counterparts’ collective $172.5 million.

As Forbes notes, this disparity has a lot to do with the jobs available: the lead roles in top-earning blockbuster franchises and superhero flicks almost always go to men. Wahlberg didn’t become the highest-paid actor working on critically acclaimed indie films; his poorly received role in Transformers: The Last Knight earned him his big bucks.

Following behind him on the list are Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, last year’s highest-paid actor, who pulled in $65 million, and Vin Diesel, whose role in eighth instalment of the Fast and Furious earned him $54.5 million. What do these top three guys have in common? They have big muscles. Also, truth be told,  they look pretty good next to explosions. Which, apparently, is how you make a lot of money these days.

“There are simply fewer parts for women that pay the sizeable backend profits that result in leading men’s large paydays, or the franchise sequels that permit aggressive negotiation for favourable deals,” Natalie Robehmed, Forbes associate editor, told The Telegraph. “According to a 2016 study, women comprise just 28.7% of all speaking roles in movies and only a quarter of roles for characters over the age of 40 – an ageism and lack of opportunity not facing Hollywood’s leading men. Until there are an equal number of high-paying roles, there will continue to be an inequality in the paychecks of Tinseltown’s very richest.”

The wage gap is bleak, but there is a redeeming light in Forbes list of grossly overpaid dudes: at least it was diverse. Last week’s round-up of highest paid actresses was comprised solely of American white women, while the men’s list includes three Bollywood stars, Jackie Chan, and multiple bi-racial actors. At least there’s progress somewhere.

Here’s Forbes full list of Hollywood’s top-earning stars.

1. Mark Wahlberg, $68 million
2. Dwayne “The Rock” Johnson, $65 million
3. Vin Diesel, $54.5 million
4. Adam Sandler, $50.5 million
5. Jackie Chan, $49 million
6. Robert Downey, Jr., $48 million
7. Tom Cruise, $43 million
8. Shah Rukh Khan, $38 million
9. Salman Khan, $37 million
10. Akshay Kumar, $35.5 million
11. Chris Hemsworth, $31.5 million
12. Tom Hanks, $31 million
13. Samuel L. Jackson, $30.5 million
14. Ryan Gosling, $29 million
15. Emma Stone, $26 million
16. Jennifer Aniston, $25.5 million
17. Jennifer Lawrence, $24 million
18. Ryan Reynolds, $21.5 million
19. Matt Damon, $21 million
20. Jeremy Renner, $19 million
21. Chris Evans, $18 million
21. Melissa McCarthy, $18 million
23. Chris Pratt, $17 million
24. Mila Kunis, $15.5 million
25. Emma Watson, $14 million
26. Mark Ruffalo, $13 million
27. Cate Blanchett, $12 million
28. Julia Roberts, $12 million
29. Amy Adams, $11.5 million

How Can a Guava Become a Staple of Street Style

Hosiery walks a fine sartorial line, leading a double life as clothing in public and lingerie in private. Its allure is in leaving something to the imagination. Nothing plays the erotic game of peekaboo better than a pair of fishnets as they simultaneously reveal and conceal what’s underneath.

Last September, Kim Kardashian posted an Instagram photo of her topless torso with black openwork Wolford tights stretching above the waistband of her half-done button fly. Like so many of her social media endeavours, the post sparked a frenzy, and the fishnets-and-denim combo took off. Worn under distressed mom jeans or glute-grazing cut-offs, the look has become an #OOTD favourite of virtually every style darling, including blogger Chiara Ferragni, model Hailey Baldwin and singer Pia Mia. In April, Kardashian’s sister Khloé commercialized the approach with a new style from her denim line Good American that features holes patched with fishnets. Meanwhile, in June, Austrian luxury hosiery company Wolford reissued the Kaylee style seen in Kardashian’s post due to popular demand.

Fishnets are a garment loaded with innuendoes, thanks to their origin in cabarets like the Moulin Rouge. In the 1970s, early punks literally tore them apart, giving nets a bad-girl reputation that still resonates nearly five decades later. “It was part of the whole punk ethos of bringing in deliberately disgusting and objectionable styles that were scavenged from bad taste or pornography or both,” says Valerie Steele, fashion historian and director and chief curator of The Museum at the Fashion Institute of Technology. “Once that happened, fishnets were really ripe to keep being revived as a somewhat punk, definitely sexy component in fashion. It re-emerges periodically every few years.” She points to the powerful suggestion of violence inherent in a pair of damaged tights. “Have you fought off someone? Or are you just so degenerate that you wear clothes that are falling apart?”

Vanessa Cesario, the 25-year-old behind Toronto style blog The Brunette Salad, channels this rebellious spirit by using fishnets to add an element of surprise to her slick streetwear-heavy ensembles. “They’re a way to amp up outfits that are otherwise safe,” she says. “I think that now, more than ever, women, myself included, like to wear things that could have been seen as taboo.”

Henley from Anita Pallenberg! 8 Vintage Treasures From Archive Stylist Bay Garnett Has Remade

There was something wildly inventive about West London fashion in the ’90s. The legendary vintage scene at Portobello Road Market, stretching from Golborne Road to Westbourne Grove, gave birth to the seemingly slapdash high-low mix that defines good street style to this day. Now, Bay Garnett, the British stylist who helped pioneer the secondhand movement, has partnered with M.i.h. Jeans to harness that magic for a new capsule collection that goes one step further than simple vintage-inspired designs. Instead, Golborne Road by Bay Garnett is a curated selection of thrifted treasures, plucked directly from her personal archive and reproduced for the masses.

These eight perfect pieces represent the crown jewels of Garnett’s expansive vintage collection, lovingly assembled on rambles through Portobello. “It was our way of life,” Garnett recalls of thrifting back then. “It was a really genuine, lovely passion that unified us.” From her home base in Shepherd’s Bush, she would set off for model Iris Palmer’s ramshackle house on the road and from there, the ragtag crew would embark on the hunt for rare, affordable finds—a soft cotton tee covered in glitter stilettos, or the elusive pair of perfect jeans. Many of those items found their way into Garnett’s editorial work—shoots for British Vogue, the pages of her cult thrifter’s zine Cheap Date—and sparked a collective desire for a more effortless, fun-loving wardrobe. “It could be dark red tracksuit bottoms with high heels and a swimsuit—almost quite Gummo, that film with Chloë Sevigny—or it could be a beautiful vintage silk dress,” Garnett says. “It didn’t matter what, it was about your own sense of style.”

That ethos feels particularly of the moment—one reason why M.i.h. founder Chloe Lonsdale, who also lived off Golborne Road in the mid-’90s, tapped Garnett for this collaboration. “I loved how people would pull out a ’30s silk tea dress, wear it over secondhand jeans and a pair of sneakers or Dr. Martens, and add a little twist of their own—jewelry, a hat,” she says. “Bay immortalized that look—what we see now as street style was single-handedly put on the map by her. It was that attitude toward dressing that I fell in love with.”

Happily, that attitude can be snapped up with one of Garnett’s vintage reproductions. Some are exact replicas (the black chinoiserie blouse with snaking buds up the collar), while others have been updated just slightly (a fleece turtleneck with elaborate ruffled sleeves, remade in soft jersey). Each has its own special history, laid out by Garnett, below—think a velour henley the color of mink, a gift from Anita Pallenberg, or those perfect flares, worn by countless It girls like Sevigny. They may be the holy grail of secondhand shopping, the sort of perfect high-waisted denim you can’t ever find new—at least, until now.

Fashion Trend Bontok has managed to reach Fever Pitch

When I was a kid, every time my family went on vacation, my mother would break out her fabulously fake Louis Vuitton fanny pack. We have photo albums filled with her posing in New York, Boston, L.A. and Quebec City, a white tee tucked into faded mom jeans and the fanny pack around her waist. She didn’t care that it was so blatantly fake. It was a gift from her girlfriends (before she moved to Canada from South Korea in 1975), and although she did own an authentic LV Speedy, she was more interested in the hands-free practicality of her “travel bag” than the inauthenticity of a perfectly fine and damn-fly-looking fanny.

Clearly my mom was ahead of her time, because fakes have gone from fashion faux pas to must-have, thanks primarily to the high-end bootlegging ways of Demna Gvasalia at Vetements and Alessandro Michele at Gucci. Gvasalia was the first to turn the fake on its head with his high-end appropriations of brands like Thrasher, Champion and Canada Goose. (Legit collabs with Champion and Canada Goose would follow.) He took his logo-subverting skills to Balenciaga via his cheeky flip on the Bernie Sanders logo for Fall 2017. Michele began toying with luxury Gucci bootlegs last year when he showed “fake” Gucci tees (inspired by the popular ’80s Chinatown knock-offs) for Resort 2017. And this past May, he one-upped himself with a series of blatantly faketastic “Guccy” sweatshirts.

This tongue-in-cheek parodying of counterfeit culture has been directly influenced by the rise of streetwear—because, despite its four-figure price tags and posh clientele, Vetements is a streetwear brand. And if you squint really hard, Gucci is starting to look like one, too. “The boundary between high and low fashion has blurred so much that it has almost disappeared,” says Hannah Watkins, senior editor of prints and graphics for global trend-forecasting agency WGSN. “Street culture has been so influential on the catwalk and vice versa. There is no line anymore.”

Harlem couturier Daniel Day (better known as “Dapper Dan” of Dapper Dan’s Boutique) was one of the first to blur that line. Day became famous in the ’80s for co-opting luxury logos for his over-the-top, hip hop-inspired designs. The idea first came to him in 1983, when a customer in his shop was bragging about his new Louis Vuitton clutch. “I thought to myself, ‘Wow, if he’s so excited about that little pouch, imagine if he had a whole outfit made out of logos?’” Day began custom-making his own all-over-print “Gucci” bombers, “LV” sweaters and “Fendi” track suits for clients like Run DMC, LL Cool J, Bobby Brown and Salt-N-Pepa. “I didn’t do knock-offs…I did knock-ups,” says Day. “The original styles were drab and boring. I created something that was more exciting than what the brands themselves were doing.” In the end, litigation forced Day to shutter his shop in 1992.

Twenty-five years later, fakes have come full circle. In perhaps the most epic “real fake” fashion moment to date, Michele paid homage to a Dapper Dan design, sending a fur bomber jacket with enormous double-G-printed balloon sleeves down the runway for Gucci’s Resort 2018. It was a luxury appropriation of a Dapper Dan appropriation of an original Louis Vuitton logo. “It’s pretty bonkers,” laughs Shannon Schafer, senior fashion director at Nordstrom. “But maybe things need to be a little bonkers right now to break through all the noise and really be disruptive.”

Even Louis Vuitton is getting in on the crazy logo play. Take, for example, its recent bag collaboration with Jeff Koons. The pop artist’s “JK” initials appear in the brand’s insignia.

“The big designers are almost embracing the idea of the bootleg because they’ve realized it’s driving their brands,” says Watkins. “They’re not taking themselves so seriously anymore. But they’re clever—they know it’s a trend right now.”

The trickle-down has been hardcore—Aritzia riffed on Vetements with its own capsule of DHL-esque sweats. And indie brands and millennial artists have also taken up the appropriation call: Ava Nirui is Helmut Lang’s digital editor by day and makes luxury-logo mash-ups by night; Imran Moosvi sells his flashy custom bootlegs to the likes of YG, Lil Yachty and Tyga; and 17-year-old Austin Butts made his own Yeezy tees, which Kanye liked so much that he included them in his own pop-ups. Not long ago, a “cease and desist” would have been the response, but now it’s a different story. “If the big designers were to go after these pop-up people now, I think it would be detrimental to their brands,” says Watkins. “Whether it’s a fake or a real design that’s being spread on social media, it’s increasing their visibility and creating hype, which is what every brand wants.”

The rise of the faux fake has also increased the cachet of the obvious fake. Instagram is flooded with selfies of swag-y millennials showing off their so-bad-they’re-good duds. Even Vogue fashion news writer Liana Satenstein recently posted a photo of a fakes haul (a “Versace” tee and blatantly bad “Chanel” totes) from Tbilisi, Georgia. This trend is more about the ironic attitude than the actual garment—it trumps authenticity and even bad taste.

In the spirit of shameless fakery, I wore my mom’s “vintage” fanny pack (which I dug out of storage a couple of years ago) to an industry party. It’s a little crushed on one side, and the lettering on the “leather” patch has practically worn off, but this only adds to it’s subversive charm. Of course, it was all anyone wanted to talk about. “That is pure perfection,” said a friend. “It’s realer than the real thing.”

Shop for Apparel In Good and Complete Shop

Dress Barn clothing stores are retail outlets which specialize in women’s clothing and apart from a prominent physical presence these stores enjoy business through the net as well through their online website. In the fashion-conscious and appearance-conscious world of today, everyone wants to present themselves in the best possible manner and since clothes form an important part of one’s overall look, it becomes imperative to select the right kind of clothes. It has been remarked many-a-times that clothes make or break a person and hence a visit to the clothing store is a must every once in a while for an individual who sets a lot of store by his clothes.

The Dress Barn Clothing Stores are not only one of the best options for women but are also well known all over the world for women’s footwear as well as accessories. These stores not only produce and sell fashion products for women, but they also offer a wide variety of apparel wherein one can select from a wide range of dresses, sweaters, skirts, pants, jackets and a variety of other accessories. Apart from featuring the latest trends and fashions at reasonable prices, one is likely to come across business wear, formal wear, casuals, accessories, handbags as well as shoes which can go through with help from one of the friendly and knowledgeable shop assistants.

Apart from the 800 retail outlets dotted all across the country, the Dress Barn clothing stores have an online website as well in which one would come across detailed catalogs of their clothing and accessories, information about the company, the various locations of their stores, the prices of their products, the latest trends and discounts and also about discounts and other schemes. Since this organization has been specialized in women’s clothing for more than 40 years, the experience is evident in the range of sizes which are offered as well as the expertise of the well trained staff which assist the customers to find the right apparel for themselves.

Planning To Start A Store Business Store

Opening a fashion retail outlet is not as easy as it sounds. Just like any other business venture, opening a clothing store can indeed be tricky. This is the reason why you need to have a clothing store business plan. Your business plan will serve as your guide as you go through the twists and turns of starting your own fashion and clothing store. Here are some factors that you must consider and include in your plan.

How much capital are you putting in? This is a very important aspect of the business plan. This will help determine how big and how extensive the business will be. This will also help determine how much merchandise you will be able to initially invest in. The capital stated in your clothing store business plan will also help determine several other important aspects of your store such as the location and the number of employees. A good location choice is important in ensuring the success of your business. Make sure that you are in a location where your market can easily access your products. At the same time, knowing how many people to employ will help you make a good projection for your costs. Know how much of the work you can do yourself in order to save costs.

Another important aspect to consider in your clothing store business plan is your target market. If you have yet to establish a name in the clothing and fashion retail industry, it is important that you first make your mark by focusing on a specific market. Are you selling clothes for women or men? Do you want to focus on kids’ clothing or perhaps you would be interested in selling clothes for babies and infants? Focus on a target market and be an expert on what they need as well as on the latest trends.

When making your clothing store business plan, it is also important to clearly envision how your business will run in next six to twelve months. This way you will be able to make a through list of your projected income and your projected expenses. List down the possible problems that you may encounter and how these problems can be resolved. There is nothing like being prepared for the worst.

Here’s How To Unlock Clothing Store At Home!

Opening a clothing store is the dream of many people and it feels so much different to be one’s own boss. However, those who want to open their own store should ask themselves questions like: how to open it? What style should the clothes be? How much money will it need to operate the store? It takes more than a thought to open a clothing store. People should consider the following aspects before opening the store.

First, why do you want to open a clothing store?

Some people are irrational when it comes to starting their own business, others are too rational and could not make the final decision, still others are the combination of the two types of people mentioned earlier, they are what we call romantic idealistic entrepreneurs. People should know why they want to open a clothing store before they actually open one.

Second, what are the odds of succeeding in starting one’s own business?

A research indicates that two out of ten people could succeed in starting their own business. Experts in this field believe that to succeed in opening clothing store, owners should make their business competitive, pay enormous attention to market change and adjust them to the new consumer cultural form in order to survive in the market.

Third, what kind of store to open?

Could you be able to provide an immediate answer when asked about what kind of store you want to open? If you are still confused about this, the following tips might help you make the final decision. You could consider opening a fashion pioneer store and create fashion trend if you are creative, passionate and willing to try new things. You could fill your store with exquisitely designed fashion items and clothes if you have a sharp and elegant taste in fashion. You could open a store selling clothes of average price if you tend to follow your feelings and put other people’s interest first.

Fourth, where should it locate?

The location of the store exerts direct influence on the profitability of the store. Therefore, owners should evaluate the surrounding environment of the store: is the transportation is convenient? Are the surrounding facilitates beneficial to the sales of the clothes? Is the population large in the surrounding area? Is the income of targeted consumers high? Owners are recommended to conduct detailed research about the location of the store before opening it.

Victoria’s Secret Casting Is Paradise Street Style

Victoria’s Secret began its search for new runway stars early this year, and the final castings are currently underway in New York. The competition is stiff, with hundreds of beauties eager to join Adriana Lima, Alessandra Ambrosio, and the Angel squad, so naturally the models in the running are putting their best feet forward. Indeed, they caused a veritable street style sensation yesterday as they headed to the brand’s Upper West Side headquarters, much to the delight of onlookers.

Casual glamour served as a recurring theme, with each model putting her own spin on the look. Liu Wen breezed by in a frayed-denim miniskirt and Chanel bag; Hailey Baldwin opted for a transparent crop top with skinny jeans, and Maria Borges delivered in a patterned romper. Many opted for lingerie-inspired pieces, including satin tops or see-through shirts, but underwear as outerwear wasn’t the only choice. Veteran VS star Izabel Goulart arrived in a ruffled, off-the-shoulder top that showed off her sculpted physique, while Angel Jasmine Tookes wore the flirtiest of summer dresses layered beneath a denim jacket. Bucking the trend for jeans and lace, Leomie Anderson found a fresh way to show her figure in a spandex Alexander Wang jumpsuit.

Though you’ll have to wait a few months to see who made the final cut, yesterday’s street style highlights provide a peek at who’ll be wearing wings come December.